Kirtland Temple
A National Historic Landmark

Nauvoo


In 1838 church members were starting to move out of Kirtland, into Far West, Missouri and eventually to Nauvoo, Illinois. "On 9 May 1839 Emma moved her family into a small two-story log house" in Nauvoo. [1] Emma would spend the last 40 years of her life in Nauvoo.

Once in Nauvoo, Emma would compile a larger hymnal. In November 1840, the Times and Seasons published this notice:

HYMNS!! HYMNS!! Having just returned from Cincinnati Ohio, with paper and other materials for publishing a new selection of Hymns which have so long been desired by the saints, we contemplate commencing the work immediately; and feeling desirous to have an extensive, and valuable book; it is requested that all those who have been endowed with a poetical genius, whose (muse) has not been altogether idle, will feel enough interest in a work of this kind, to immediately forward all (choice) others; we mean (all) who have good hymns that will cheer the heart of the righteous man, to send them as soon as practicable, directed to Mrs. Emma Smith, Nauvoo, Ill. POST PAID. [2]

The newspaper itself published many hymns over the years. Hymn scholar Richard Clothier states, "The 131 issues of the [Times and Seasons], from November 1839 to February 1846, contain an amazing outpouring of literature, scripture, poetry, and news." [3] The poem, "Nauvoo," is from the Times and Seasons, written by a visitor to Nauvoo named "Laura" [4] (See transcription of Nauvoo Poem as printed in newspaper).

Notes:

[1] Newell and Valeen Tippetts Avery, Mormon Enigma: Emma Hale Smith (New York: Doubleday, 1984), 83.

[2] "Hymns!! Hymns!!" Times and Seasons 2 (1 November 1840): 204.

[3] Richard Clothier, "The Singing Saints: A Festival of Hymns and History," for John Whitmer Historical Association, Nauvoo, Illinois, 2002.

[4] "Nauvoo," Times and Seasons 5 (15 October 1844): 687.


 

 

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